20. March 2015 · Comments Off on Genetic study sheds new light on TB pathogenesis · Categories: Papers, Science · Tags: , , ,

One of the world’s most ancient diseases

Tuberculosis, also known as consumption, was first recorded in Greek literature around 460 BCE. Hippocrates identified it as the most widespread and fatal disease of his time. Tuberculosis (TB) is caused by a pathogen called Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb). In Greek myco refers to a mushroom-like shape, vividly describing these fungal looking bacterium that float into the human system through the airways.

TB accounted for approximately 25% of total deaths in Europe from the 17th to 19th centuries. Many of the writers and artists of the Victorian era suffered and died from the disease and painted it with a pathological – yet somehow romantic – extreme: febrile, unrelenting and breathless.

Experiment eleven

It was not until 1943 when a young Ph.D. student called Albert Schatz, from Professor Selman Waksman’s lab at Rutger’s University in the US, discovered the first effective cure for treating TB. On Schatz’s eleventh experiment on a common bacterium found in farmyard soil, the first antibiotic agent for treating TB, streptomycin, was discovered. The battle for the ownership of streptomycin became a famous scientific scandal [Experiment Eleven], when Waksman took credit and the Nobel prize for the discovery, downplaying Schatz’s contributions. Thanks to a sustained effort from the government and society, including better nutrition, housing, improved sewage systems and ventilation, the number of TB cases was reduced significantly by the 1980s. The efforts to seek cures for TB have not only brought TB mortality down, but also helped to shape modern medicine and our understanding towards infectious illness.
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