The American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG, pronounced “A-shag”), annual meeting is a scientific, networking and socializing milestone every year. This year the meeting was 8 time zones away from the UK in San Francisco, CA. It was a busy year for our group, with 4 talks and a poster being presented, a variety of collaborators’ meetings to attend, a choice of hundreds of talks to listen to, and, of course, plenty of drinking to do.

Each member of the group who was there offers their thoughts after the break. It’s interesting to see that while we covered a wide variety of topics across the group, the most consistent message is that this year didn’t yield any major discoveries that will change the field. Instead, we all saw incremental progress in applying next-gen sequencing and similar technologies to many different problems. Perhaps this is simply a reflection of the nature of modern human genetics: a gradual improvement of our understanding, rather than a sudden revelation.

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Out this week in Nature is the first big paper from the inflammatory bowel disease Immunochip project. The international project collected data from over 75 thousand individuals, and brought the total number of known IBD loci to a record-breaking 163. You can read more about the paper on the Sanger Institute website.

One interesting thing about the paper was how difficult it was to visualize the results. With one exception there were no single image that naturally fell out of any of the analyses, and we had to put quite a bit of work into displaying the messages of the paper in the figures. You can judge for yourself how much success we had, but I can say that up until the last few days before submission we still had images that everyone hated but couldn’t think what to replace them with. The last one to be replaced was the evocatively named “Smear-o-venn”, that we were all relieved to see the back of.

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